Under CONSTRUCTION

May I begin saying, today, right now. You all are who you are, warts and all. Don't change anymore, or don't change for anyone. As my brother would always say, "it is what it is." Life's things alter us and the passing years as well. But let us think about this. You're never who you thought you were or was at all. This gets confusing - life and love. So, many I think today say that maybe silence is golden. Nothing could be further from the truth. Just do not let the awful cruel people ever grind you down. The ones that actually do not care what they sometimes do, say or how they might act. Thousands upon thousands don't put themselves in your shoes, or take a hard look at themselves. Their own faults. But for me when I say I care and I love
 YOU ARE WHAT YOU ARE WARTS AND ALL.. I'M NOT CHANGING ANYMORE FOR ANYONE.. BUT NOTHINGS SET IN STONE AT ALL.. IT IS AS IT IS LIFES THINGS ALTER US  AND THE  PASSING YEARS AT TIMES.. BUT REALLY YOU'RE NEVER WHO YOU THOUGHT YOU WERE OR WAS AT ALL VERY CONFUSING IS LIFE AND LOVE TO ME....SO TODAY MAYBE SILENCE IS GOLDEN..WELL FOR NOW.. TAKE CARE OUT THERE DON'T LET THE MORE   AWFUL CRUEL.. B*STA*DS/PEOPLE.. GRIND YOU DOWN..WHO NEVER THINK..WHAT THEY DO OR SAY.. OR LOOK AT THEMSELVES.. THEIR OWN FAULTS  BUT FOR ME WHEN YOU REALLY CARE FOR OR LOVE  SOMEONE.. FOLKS/PEOPLE THEY DON'T JUDGE YOU MUCH OR SAY MUCH..I'VE FOUGHT LONG AND HARD TO GET TO WHERE I AM TO WHERE I WAS.. AND SOMETIMES IT KIND OF SMARTS/HURTS BUT HOW LIFE IS AND PEOPLE..I CAN'T CHANGE IT I'LL HAVE TO TRY ROLL WITH THE SMACKS/ PUNCHES MORE I THINK BUT HOW I DUNNO? I'M SICK OF FIGHTING OTHERS AND DODGING THEIR PUNCHES,,THAT'S THE HARDEST BITS OR MAYBE THE TRUTH OF IT I CANT HANDLE..OR MAYBE TIME TO LET THEM GO ? 


Rush Limbaugh
 
"... My days on earth are numbered; But before I fade away, there is something important I need to say. It may not be important to anyone else; but it's important to me. Win, lose or fraud...President Trump, I just want to say thank you for the last four years. Thank you for making it cool to be an American again. Thank you for showing us that we don’t need to be under China’s thumb anymore economically, or any other way. Thank you for one of the strongest economies we’ve ever experienced in my lifetime. Thank you for all you have done for the minority communities, and the outstanding decrease in the unemployment rate you had. Thank you for making it feel good to love our country and to be a proud patriot again. Thank you for supporting our Nation's flag and the men and women who fought for the freedom that stands behind that flag. Thank you for supporting our nation's law enforcement organizations, and understanding how difficult their job really is. Thank you for quelling the flood of illegal immigration, and bringing to justice the thousands of criminals that flood brought us. Thank you for giving corporations a reason to come back to America to make our own products and put Americans back to work. Thank you for bringing our troops home from endless deployments that presented us with little more than body bags; and for your commitment to strengthen our military. Thank you for operation warp speed and keeping your promise to bringing the Covid 19 vaccine to us in less than a year. Thank you for your never-ending attempts at bringing peace to the Middle East and your support for Israel. Thank you for your Tax relief, and thank you for our energy independence. Most of all though...THANK YOU for taking a damn rotten job that you never had to take!! Thank you for caring enough for this country to want to try and make a difference. Thank you for showing America how little Career Politicians actually work for their constituents; and for showing us how much those politicians despise you for showing America how easy it is to build a great nation, rather than rape her to line their own pockets and stock portfolios. Thank you for allowing us to experience a President that wasn’t a lifelong politician, but a lifelong American. THANK YOU MR PRESIDENT... YOU DID YOUR BEST…"


One of the better stories I have read in a long time.
Dr. Frank Mayfield was touring Tewksbury Institute when, on his way out, he accidentally collided with an elderly floor maid. To cover the awkward moment Dr. May field started asking questions.
"How long have you worked here?"
"I've worked here almost since the place opened," the maid replied.
"What can you tell me about the history of this place?" he asked.
"I don't think I can tell you anything, but I could show you something."
With that, she took his hand and led him down to the basement under the oldest section of the building. She pointed to one of what looked like small prison cells, their iron bars rusted with age, and said, "That's the cage where they used to keep Annie Sullivan."
"Who's Annie?" the doctor asked.
Annie was a young girl who was brought in here because she was incorrigible—nobody could do anything with her. She'd bite and scream and throw her food at people. The doctors and nurses couldn't even examine her or anything. I'd see them trying with her spitting and scratching at them.
"I was only a few years younger than her myself and I used to think, 'I sure would hate to be locked up in a cage like that.' I wanted to help her, but I didn't have any idea what I could do. I mean, if the doctors and nurses couldn't help her, what could someone like me do?
"I didn't know what else to do, so I just baked her some brownies one night after work. The next day I brought them in. I walked carefully to her cage and said, 'Annie, I baked these brownies just for you. I'll put them right here on the floor and you can come and get them if you want.'
"Then I got out of there just as fast as I could because I was afraid she might throw them at me. But she didn't. She actually took the brownies and ate them. After that, she was just a little bit nicer to me when I was around. And sometimes I'd talk to her. Once, I even got her laughing.
One of the nurses noticed this and she told the doctor. They asked me if I'd help them with Annie. I said I would if I could. So that's how it came about that. Every time they wanted to see Annie or examine her, I went into the cage first and explained and calmed her down and held her hand.
This is how they discovered that Annie was almost blind."
After they'd been working with her for about a year—and it was tough sledding with Annie—the Perkins institute for the Blind opened its doors. They were able to help her and she went on to study and she became a teacher herself.
Annie came back to the Tewksbury Institute to visit, and to see what she could do to help out. At first, the Director didn't say anything and then he thought about a letter he'd just received. A man had written to him about his daughter. She was absolutely unruly—almost like an animal. She was blind and deaf as well as 'deranged.'
He was at his wit's end, but he didn't want to put her in an asylum. So he wrote the Institute to ask if they knew of anyone who would come to his house and work with his daughter.
And that is how Annie Sullivan became the lifelong companion of Helen Keller.
When Helen Keller received the Nobel Prize, she was asked who had the greatest impact on her life and she said, "Annie Sullivan."
But Annie said, "No Helen. The woman who had the greatest influence on both our lives was a floor maid at the Tewksbury Institute."
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